Sunday, August 02, 2015

Cilla Black, R. I. P.

NY Daily News: LONDON — Big-voiced British singer Cilla Black, a product of Beatles-era Liverpool who became a national treasure over a 50-year music and television career, has died. She was 72. 

Hat tip to Jeff Meyerson.

How Shakespeare Changed America’s Wildlife

How Shakespeare Changed America’s Wildlife

Song of the Day

Emmylou Harris - Wayfaring Stranger - YouTube:

6 Historical Heads Stolen From Their Graves

6 Historical Heads Stolen From Their Graves 

Today's Vintage Ad


6 Hilariously Stupid Early Personas Of Wrestling Superstars

6 Hilariously Stupid Early Personas Of Wrestling Superstars

PaperBack



Belli Luigi, The Metal Monster, World Distributors, 1950

Or Maybe You Do

28 Facts You Might Not Know about The Munsters

EQMM Podcast with Josh Pachter

PodOmatic: Join us this month for a story set in 1980s Bahrain. Part of a series begun in EQMM in 1984, "The Night of Power" (EQMM September 1986) has recently been republished in the collection The Tree of Life (Wildside Press). It is read for us here by the author, Josh Pachter, a frequent contributor of fiction and translations to our magazine.

Authors Reflect on Part 1 of the World's Largest Sherlock Holmes Collection

Authors Reflect on Part 1 of the World's Largest Sherlock Holmes Collection - I Hear of Sherlock Everywhere

Once Again Texas Leads the Way

Texas couple adds 80th Dodge Viper to their world-record collection of cars 

Saturday, August 01, 2015

Florida Man!

Man tries to chew off fingerprints after arrest

Free for Kindle for a Limited Time

THERE ARE ALIENS BEHIND URANUS, MR. PRESIDENT, Emerson LaSalle - Amazon.com:  This is a NOVELLA from pulp, sci-fi master Emerson LaSalle and includes the short story "Harry Truman vs The Aliens" which acts as a prologue.

It is the atomic age of sci-fi in the rip-roaring 1950s! 

WARNING: This work of fiction contains plenty of SEX and VIOLENCE.

14 Out-Of-This-World Photos Of Friday's Blue Moon

14 Out-Of-This-World Photos Of Friday's Blue Moon

The Rumor That Paul McCartney Died in 1966 and Was Secretly Replaced by a Look-Alike

How the Rumor That Paul McCartney Died in 1966 and Was Secretly Replaced by a Look-Alike Got Started

Song of the Day

MISERY LOVES COMPANY - YouTube:

The Weird Week in Review

The Weird Week in Review

Today's Vintage Ad


I'm Sure You'll All Agree

BBC - Culture - The 100 greatest American films

PaperBack



Jim Hollis, The Case of the Bludgeoned Teacher, Avon, 1956

Or Maybe You Do

10 Things You Might Not Know About the Ford Mustang 

This Weekend in History (August 1 & 2)

This Weekend in History (August 1 & 2) 

How the Very Special Episode Defined Morality for a Generation

From 'Diff'rent Strokes' to 'Family Ties,' How the Very Special Episode Defined Morality for a Generation  

Link via mental_floss.

I Miss the Old Days

Kids used to cuddle alligators at this wacky LA zoo: One of the most novel and interesting sights in the world. Most stupendous aggregation ever exhibited.  

Link via The Presurfer.

I Found a Penny Last Week

10 Incredible Pop Culture Items Found in Unexpected Places

Friday, July 31, 2015

First It was the Thin Mints Melee

Gary man cuts off his fingers in alleged sword attack on girlfriend

Roddy Piper, R. I. P.

NY Daily News: Legendary wrestling champion "Rowdy" Roddy Piper has died at the age of 61, World Wrestling Entertainment has confirmed.

Hat tip to Jeff Meyerson.

Harper Lee, Dr. Seuss, and now . . .

Long-lost Fitzgerald story finally published

Lynn Anderson, R. I. P.

'Rose Garden' singer Lynn Anderson dies at 67: Country singer Lynn Anderson, best known for her classic recording “(I Never Promised You a) Rose Garden,” died Thursday night of a heart attack at Vanderbilt University Medical Center.

Stark House: Great New Peter Rabe Trio

Ed Gorman's blog: Stark House: Great New Peter Rabe Trio, super intro by Rick Ollerman

PAPERBACK PARADE #89 New Issue Out!

PAPERBACK PARADE #89 New Issue Out!

9 Celebrity #TBT Photos You May Have Missed This Week

9 Celebrity #TBT Photos You May Have Missed This Week  

Naturally #9 is my fave.

I'm Sure You'll All Agree

50 Greatest Kids' Movies of All Time  

Hat tip to Jeff Meyerson for this annoying slideshow.

Baseball's Greatest Deaf Player

William Ellsworth “Dummy" Hoy: Baseball's Greatest Deaf Player

Song of the Day

Big Jay McNeely-There Is Something On Your Mind - YouTube:

I Miss the Old Days

Meet the Original “Victoria’s Secret” Beauties of the 1920s 

Today's Vintage Ad


Once Again Texas Leads the Way

Phoenix Breaking News, Weather, Sport: ODESSA, TX (KOSA/CNN) – Witnesses say three people performed an exorcism at a public park in Texas on Thursday morning.

PaperBack



C. S. Lewis, Perelandra, Avon, 1950

Once Again Texas Leads the Way

He don't want no ricochet romance: Texas man shot after bullet richocets off armadillo  

And where is the proofreader?

So It's Come to This

Everything Is Problematic, University Explains: The University of New Hampshire has a “Bias-Free Language Guide.” As the document assures its readers, it “is not meant to represent absolute requirements of language use.” (Universities have tried imposing absolute requirements of language use, only to be struck down on First Amendment grounds.) So the guide should be understood not as an attempt at censorship, which would be illegal, but as a cutting-edge statement of p.c. language norms. It indicates that the list of terms that can give offense has grown quite long indeed.

I For One Welcome Or New Scaly Reptilian Overlords

ALLIGATORS USE TOOLS TO HUNT BIRDS - YouTube: Alligators Use Tools to Hunt Birds. Alligators and crocodiles are believed to lure in birds with the aid of sticks which they balance on their snouts. The birds are attracted to the sticks for use in their nest, so this behavior is witnessed significantly more often during the breeding season. This is the first time tool use has ever been documented in any reptile.  

Hat tip to Jeff Segal.

Because They Are There?

Why Two Men Are Walking Every Block of New York City

The Magical Illustration of Arthur Rackham

Rip Van Winkle by Washington Irving, illustrated by Arthur RackhamThe Magical Illustration of Arthur Rackham: Arthur Rackham was an illustrator in the late 19th and early 20th century. He was born in London in 1867. He began studying at the Lambeth School of Art at the age of 18, and soon found his passion and calling. The first of Rackham's illustrations to be published in a book were in 1893, in The Dolly Dialogues. Rackham never looked back. From that first publication, illustration was his career until the day he died at age 72, of cancer.

Forgotten Books: The Card Turner -- Louis Sachar

This post first appeared on the blog on July 27, 2010.

Everyone told Louis Sachar that he shouldn't write a YA novel about bridge. His agent, his wife, and his publisher all warned against it. He did it anyway because he loved bridge and because he'd like to see young people learn the game. I don't know that the book will achieve that purpose, but I liked it a lot. In fact, although it's over 300 pages, I read it in one sitting.

It's the story of Alton Richards, who's hired one summer to be his uncle's cardturner. His uncle is a great bridge player, but he's gone blind. That's no obstacle to his playing in one way, since he can remember all the cards without having to see them. He just needs someone to handle them. That's Alton's job.

Alton knows nothing about the game, so that gives Sachar a chance to explain things to the reader. But he warns you every time something technical is coming up and even puts a whale in the middle of the page so you can skip it if you want to. (I didn't skip.) Things move along about as you'd expect until suddenly there's a big twist that I won't reveal. I know I wasn't expecting it, though maybe I should have been.

Besides being a bridge novel, this is a coming-of-age story, and I'm a sucker for those. It's also very funny at times, and I'm a sucker for that, too. I bought the book for Judy, who loves bridge, but I'm glad I read it, myself. Great fun.

But about that cover, which appears to show a guy asleep in a train station. What does that have to do with bridge? Or this book? Nothing whatsoever, as far as I can tell. Sachar's a big-time bestselling writer, though, and he must have had cover approval. Maybe I'm missing something here, but I just don't get it. Read the book and see if you can figure it out. And let me know if you do.